GZA collaborating with Vangelis?!

This is way more exciting than some half-assed Wu reunion, and certainly more than a (still unsold) $5 million, one of a kind, document of any such reunion. VanGZAlis.

GZA and Vangelis

http://pitchfork.com/news/60990-gza-working-with-vangelis-on-new-album/

Song Of The Day: The Ink Spots – If I Didn’t Care

Thumbing through my recently thrifted copy of Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner, I discovered that it was to be this Ink Spots classic, and not One More Kiss Dear, that played as Deckard bought booze after retiring Zhora. Who thought an Ink Spots post would get all Sci-Fi on your ass? Seven degrees of Philip K Dick.

Happy birthday, Vangelis

If my name were Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou, I might go by a pseudonym as well. The synth sounds of Vangelis, first warped my mind when, as a pre-teen, I was taken to see Blade Runner, and summarily blown away by all it’s constituent parts, soundtrack certainly included. Years later, I would discover the further joys of Vangelis, including more synth scores, his work with Demis Roussos and Loukas Sideras in the Greek Prog Rock powerhouse of Aphrodite’s Child, and his deft hand at production.






Check out the recently discovered, twelve hours of tape, privately commissioned for Greek medical classes, known as The Tegos Tapes, much of which can be heard on this soundcloud page https://soundcloud.com/nev-dorrington
and the story of the discovery of said tapes http://vangeliscollector.com/movies_microneurosurgery.htm
and a couple of my favorite Vangelis productions



R.I.P. Demis Roussos

Though he went on to much wider celebrity as a wildly popular solo act, Demis Roussos holds a spot importance to me is as singer and bassist of the Greek Prog group, Aphrodite’s Child, where he, and soon to be legendary composer Vangelis Papathanassiou, crafted beautiful arrangements that alternated between heavy, outrageous pomp (in the best way that only prog groups can) and subtle balladry. Enjoy some prime era Aphrodite’s Child clips (who knew they had so many?!).




Their crowning glory, the sprawling 2LP set, 666, to which a youtuber was kind enough to put lyrics. “We got the system, to fuck the system!”


Chrisma, aka Krisma: Italian New Wave produced by the Greek genius, Vangelis. Black Silk Stocking, TV show performance!!

“Black Silk Stocking” is one of those songs that whenever I play it out, at least one person asks what it is. It’s a dark, sexy tune with an incessant rhythm and a vicious guitar lead over its entirety . Creepy, yet danceable and fun.

Their first three albums (the third of which saw the name change to to “K” spelling), are all worth a listen but the debut, “Chinese Restaurant” (on which these songs appear), is their classic. Produced by former Aphrodite’s Child member and prog/new age icon, Vangelis, there is a diversity and spark to this collection that I find tremendously appealing. In fact I suggest checking out other Vangelis productions (“Hazy Day” by Helen Banks and “The Land” by Dimitri, come to mind) and solo work (such as his middle eastern psych tinged “The Dragon” and, of course, the “Blade Runner” soundtrack), as the man was not afraid to work in an array of genres, producing interesting and rewarding results.

As far as the video goes, it’s a highly entertaining lip-sync performance of “Black Silk Stocking” and the Italian top 10 hit “Lola”. Quite the contrast in sound between the two but as I said, they are diverse. As a bonus to Italian speakers, there is a 2003 interview with Chrisma, by disco queen Amanda Lear, attached to the end of this clip.

I could not let this post go without adding another favorite from “Chinese Restaurant”, the motorik pulsebeat bliss of “C-Rock”, which probably should have been called “K-Rock” for its Krautrock, in particular Neu, indebtedness.

Final interesting side note: Vangelis was not the only famous soundtrack composer with whom Chrisma worked. Hans Zimmer (Lion King, Dark Knight, Inception, etc) played keyboards on their third LP.